Musician Ben Rector to Open for NEEDTOBREATHE on April 28

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Concert set for 8 p.m. at Gardner-Webb University 

BOILING SPRINGS, N.C.— Ben Rector will open the much-anticipated NEEDTOBREATHE concert on April 28 at 8 p.m. in Gardner-Webb University’s Paul Porter Arena.

Rector, a pop musician from Nashville, Tenn., won the grand prize in the pop category of the 2006 John Lennon Songwriting Contest for his song “Conversation.” He is the youngest person ever to win the award. In 2011, “Something Like This,” his fourth and most critically acclaimed album, landed at #41 on the Billboard 200, his highest-charting project.  Rector’s influences include The Beatles, James Taylor, Billy Joel and Randy Newman.

As a child Rector took piano lessons, but did not begin playing music seriously until he picked up the guitar in high school. He began writing songs in 10th grade and played numerous club shows in Tulsa, Okla., with his band, Euromart. Then while studying marketing at the University of Arkansas, Rector began recording solo.

“I try to put enough craft into my music so it’s not super simple or gimmicky,” said Rector in an interview posted on Billboard.com.  “For me, it’s all about the song.”  Rector’s songs have been featured on various hit shows, including One Tree Hill, Teen Mom, Pretty Little Liars, and in ABC’s Modern Family promotions.

Ben Rector/NEEDTOBREATHE concert tickets can be purchased online through etix.com for $20 per ticket, $15 each for groups of 10 or more, and $10 for GWU undergraduate day students.  Tickets are also available in the Gardner-Webb Student Activities Box Office.  More information is available by calling Haley Pond at 704-406-4268.

Half of the proceeds from ticket sales will benefit Project Rescue, an international ministry that rescues women and children from human trafficking and sexual slavery.  For more, visit projectrescue.com.

Located in Boiling Springs, N.C., Gardner-Webb University is home to over 4,300 students from 37 states and 21 foreign countries. 

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Written by communications students Molly Rhyne and Justin Guthrie.