Course Catalog

Academic Regulations

DEGREES AND MAJOR FIELDS

Gardner-Webb University offers the following degrees and major fields of study:

 

DOCTORAL PROGRAMS

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.)

Doctor of Nursing Practice (D.N.P.)

 

MASTER’S PROGRAMS

Master of Arts (M.A.); Master of Divinity (M.Div.); Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.); International Master of Business Administration (I.M.B.A.); Master of Accountancy (M.Acc.); Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.)

 

Areas are: Business, Divinity, Elementary Education, English, English Education, Executive Leadership Studies, Mental Health Counseling, Middle Grades Education, Nursing, School Counseling, and Sport Science and Pedagogy.

 

See the graduate catalog for degree requirements

 

BACHELOR OF ARTS (B.A)

American Sign Language
Art
Art Education (K-12)
Biblical Studies
Communication Studies
Discipleship Studies
English
English-Teacher Licensure (9-12)
English as a Second Language
Teacher Licensure (K-12)
French
French-Teacher Licensure (K-12)
Global Studies
History
Journalism
Missiology
Music
Philosophy and Theology
Political Science
Religious Studies
Social Sciences
Social Studies-Teacher Licensure (9-12)
Sociology
Spanish
Spanish-Teacher Licensure (K-12)
Theatre Arts
World Religions
Youth Discipleship Studies

 

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS (B.F.A.)

Art

 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC (B.M.)

Music Education (K-12)Music Composition
Music PerformanceSacred Music
Music with Electives in Music Business

 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (B.S.)

AccountancyHealthcare Management
Athletic TrainingInternational Business
BiologyMarketing
Business AdministrationMathematics
ChemistryMathematics-Teacher Licensure (9-12)
Computer Information SystemsMiddle Grades Education (6-9)
Computer SciencePhysical Education/Health Education
Economics/FinanceTeacher Licensure (K-12)
Elementary Education (K-6)Physician Assistant Track
Environmental SciencePsychology
Exercise ScienceSport Management

 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING (B.S.N.)

Nursing

R.N. to B.S.N. (See GOAL Program Catalog)

 

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE (A.S.)

Nursing

 

BACHELOR'S DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Gardner-Webb University offers an academic program consisting of a minimum of 128 semester hours of credit for the bachelor’s degree. The degree consists of a major field of concentration in the liberal arts or in a professional or preprofessional area, a general studies program, and elective courses. Some of the programs also require a minor field of concentration. To earn a baccalaureate degree the student completes the academic program on the following pages.

 

GENERAL STUDIES REQUIREMENTS

Consistent with the best practices of the higher education community, Gardner-Webb University’s general education curriculum includes a series of broad and intensive learning experiences. These experiences have been carefully designed to meet a diverse set of learning goals, which in turn have been developed on the basis of the University’s mission and heritage. Specifically, the faculty has identified seven major learning goals as the intended outcome of the general education curriculum.

 

Students who complete their studies at Gardner-Webb University will

 

  • Gain knowledge of the heritage within which Gardner-Webb stands and to which it is committed—a heritage grounded in the integration of scholarship with Christian life and ethics;
  • Experience sufficient breadth and depth in the Liberal Arts to provide the knowledge and skills necessary to make connections between and among disciplines;
  • Develop communication skills;
  • Learn to think critically;
  • Develop information literacy skills;
  • Gain knowledge about the mental, physical, and spiritual aspects of daily living;
  • Gain knowledge about our world, including its diversity of cultures and viewpoints, and develop the skills needed for life and the practice of their future professions in a global community.

COMPLETION OF GENERAL STUDIES AS FOLLOWS:

BASIC COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF ARTS, BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS, AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREES                                   Semester Hours Required

 

I. Dimensions of the Humanities (11-21 hours)

 

Composition, Literature, and Communication.............................................11-12

 

English Composition I (ENGL 101)*

English Composition II (ENGL 102)

Literature (one of the following: ENGL 211, 212, 231, 232, 251,252)

Oral Communication (one of the following: COMM 233, BADM 325,

THEA 330, EDUC 450, ENGL 270, RELI 354, or two semesters of

COMM 235 (debate)

 

Foreign Language..............................................................................................0-9

 

The student must complete a foreign language through the first semester of the intermediate level (201). The number of hours required depends upon the student’s entering competency level (either FREN 101, 102, 201; GERM 101, 102, 201; GREK 101, 102, 201; HEBR 101, 102, 201; SPAN 101,102, 201; SGLG 101, 102, 201).

 

Students with two or more units of a foreign language in high school typically begin at the 102 or 201 level; those with exceptional ability may satisfy the requirement through testing.

 

*Some students, based on test scores, must take CRLT 101 & ENGL 191 as prerequisites/corequisites for core courses in the general studies curriculum.

 

II. Dimensions of Faith.................................................................................................6

 

Old Testament (RELI 101)

New Testament (RELI 102)

 

III. Dimensions of Heritage (15 semester hours)

Western Heritage.................................................................................................6

Western Civilization I (HIST 101)

Western Civilization II (HIST 102)

Global Heritage: choose one of the following.....................................................3

Global Understanding (SSCI 205)

Religion and Culture in a Global Perspective (RELI 245)

American Heritage: choose two of the following.................................................6

Economics and the Free Market System (ECON 203)

The American Political Process (POLS 202)

The American Century (HIST 245)

Technology and American Society (COMM 230)

 

IV. Dimensions of Self (10 semester hours)

Dimensions of University Life in a Global Society (UNIV 111)............................3

Dimensions of Personal Health (HLED 221).....................................................3

Physical Dimensions of Wellness – Choose one course from one of the

following areas:..........................................................................................1

(Fitness) PHED 140-145

(Lifetime Sports) PHED 150-159

(Outdoor Adventure) PHED 160-165.

Art Survey (ARTS 225) or Music Survey (MUSC 225) or Theatre Survey (THEA 235)...3

 

V. Dimensions of Scientific Inquiry (8 semester hours)

Life Science (either BIOL 101, 104 or 111)......................................................4

Physical Science (either CHEM 103, 111 or 251; GEOL 101, 102, 105, or 106;

PHYS 103, 104, 111)....................................................................................4

 

VI. Dimensions of Quantitative Analysis (3-4 semester hours)........................................3-4

Choose one of the following: Fundamentals of Statistics and Probability (MATH

105), Finite Mathematics (MATH 110), Precalculus (MATH 150), Calculus

(MATH 151), Calculus for Business and Social Sciences (MATH 219),

Mathematics for Liberal Arts (MATH 120)

Some students, based on test scores, must take MATH 100 as a prerequisite for

core courses in the general studies curriculum.

 

VII.Dimensions (DIMS 111-116, six semesters)..............................................................3

 

BASIC COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING DEGREE

Semester Hours Required

I. Dimensions of the Humanities (11-21 hours)

Composition, Literature, and Communication....................................................9

English Composition I (ENGL 101)

English Composition II (ENGL 102)

Literature (one of the following: ENGL 211, 212, 231, 232, 251,252)

Oral Communication (Competency is met by NURS 307 in the major;

no additional hours required.)

Foreign Language......................................................................................0-6

The student must complete a foreign language through the second semester

of the elementary level (102). The number of hours required depends upon the

student’s entering competency level (either FREN 101, 102; GERM 101, 102;

GREK 101, 102; HEBR 101, 102, 201; SPAN 101,102; SGLG 101, 102).

Students with two or more units of a foreign language in high school/

typically begin at the 102 level; those with exceptional ability may satisfy

the requirement through testing.

 

II. Dimensions of Faith..............................................................................................6

Old Testament (RELI 101)

New Testament (RELI 102)

 

III. Dimensions of Heritage (15 semester hours)

Western Heritage........................................................................................6

Western Civilization I (HIST 101)

Western Civilization II (HIST 102)

Global Heritage: choose one of the following...................................................3

Global Understanding (SSCI 205)

Religion and Culture in a Global Perspective (RELI 245)

American Heritage: choose two of the following..............................................6

Economics and the Free Market System (ECON 203)

The American Political Process (POLS 202)

The American Century (HIST 245)

Technology and American Society (COMM 230)

 

IV. Dimensions of Self (10 semester hours)

Dimensions of University Life in a Global Society (UNIV 111)...........................3

Dimensions of Personal Health (HLED 221)...................................................3

Physical Dimensions of Wellness – Choose one course from one of the

following areas:.........................................................................................1

(Fitness) PHED 140-145

(Lifetime Sports) PHED 150-159

(Outdoor Adventure) PHED 160-165.

Art Survey (ARTS 225) or Music Survey (MUSC 225) or Theatre Survey (THEA 235)......3

 

V. Dimensions of Scientific Inquiry (18 semester hours)

Behavioral Science (PSYC 201, 206).........................................................................6

Life Science (BIOL 105*, 203*, 204*) ....................................................................12

* Must have “C” or better

 

VI. Dimensions of Quantitative Analysis (3-4 semester hours)...............................................3-4

Choose one of the following: Fundamentals of Statistics and Probability (MATH

105), Finite Mathematics (MATH 110), Precalculus (MATH 150), Calculus

(MATH 151), Calculus for Business and Social Sciences (MATH 219),

Mathematics for Liberal Arts (MATH 120)

 

VII.Dimensions (DIMS 111-116, six semesters).....................................................................3

 

BASIC COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF MUSIC DEGREE         Semester Hours Required

 

I. Dimensions of the Humanities (6-15 hours)

Composition, Literature, and Communication...(6-9) 6 ED*, 6 MIBS*, 8-9 others)

ENGL 101 English Composition I ..................................................................3

ENGL 102 English Composition II .................................................................3

ENGL 211, 212, 231, 232, 251, or 252 .....................................................0*-3

Literature OR

COMM 233, BADM 325, THEA 330,

*EDUC 450, MIBS 490, ENGL 270, RELI 354, or

two semesters of COMM 235 Oral Communication

(*Music Education Majors meet the COMM requirement through student

teaching. Music Business students meet the COMM requirements

through their internship and required journal oral presentation. SACS

requires competency in the area of communication; therefore, B.M.

students who choose to take literature rather than communication as

part of the Dimensions of the Humanities will be required to present

either a lecture-recital or a composition lecture-presentation during their

senior year. These students will receive instruction in research and

presentation in classes and private lessons prior to the public

presentation. Additionally, all B.M. students are required to take 1 hour

of vocal instruction and/or 1 credit of choral conducting in which they

are taught proper use of the voice.)

Foreign Language ............................................................................................... 0-6

The student must complete 6 credits of foreign language study in the

same language, or students may test out of the 102 level. If a student

tests out of the foreign language requirement, the student must take 6

credits of electives in any field. Music Ed majors do not need to take

electives if they test out of foreign language.

 

II. Dimensions of Faith........................................................................................................6

RELI 101 Old Testament

RELI 102 New Testament

 

III. Dimensions of Heritage (9 ED, 9 MIBS**,12 Others +)

Western Heritage..................................................................................................6

HIST 101 Western Civilization I

HIST 102 Western Civilization II

Global Heritage – Choose one of the following: ...............................................3

SSCI 205 Global Understanding

RELI 245 Religion and Culture in a Global Perspective

AND/OR

American Heritage – Choose one of the following: ....................................................3

ECON 203 Economics and the Free Market System

POLS 202 The American Political Process\

HIST 245 The American Century

COMM 230 Technology and American Society

**Music Ed and Music Bus. majors are to take 2 Western Heritage and 1 American Heritage

+All other B.M. majors must take 2 Western Heritage, 1 Global Heritage, and 1 American

Heritage

 

IV. Dimensions of Self (8 semester hours)

UNIV 101 First-Year Experience............................................................................1

HLED 221 Dimensions of Personal Health ..............................................................3

Physical Dimensions of Wellness – Choose one course from one of the

following areas:..................................................................................................1

(Fitness) PHED 140-145

(Lifetime Sports) PHED 150-159

(Outdoor Adventure) PHED 160-165

MUSC 226 Music Literature ..................................................................................3

 

V. Dimensions of Scientific Inquiry (4-8* semester hours)

BIOL 101 or 104 (Life Science)...............................................................................4

CHEM 103 or 111; or GEOL 101, 102, or 105............................................................4

or PHYS 103, 104, or 201 (Physical Science)

*Music Ed Students required to take 8 credits; all other music majors

required to take one lab science, 4 credits

 

VI. Dimensions of Quantitative Analysis (3-4 semester hours).............................................3-4

Choose one of the following: MATH 105, 110, 120, 150 or 151

 

VII. Dimensions ...............................................................................................................3

DIMS 111-116, six semesters

 

NOTES

 

  1. Students will complete the English requirement for graduation by registering for and earning appropriate grades in CRLT 101 (when required), ENGL 101 and ENGL 102, beginning with their first semester of enrollment and continuing uninterrupted until the requirements for graduation are satisfied. Permission to withdraw from ENGL 101 or ENGL 102 will be granted only under extraordinary circumstances. The permission of the Chair of the English Department and the Associate Provost for Arts and Sciences is required. Students required to take CRLT 101 or Math 100 courses must achieve a minimum final grade of “C” (2.00) in order to be released from required enrollment in the course(s). This means that students may not drop these courses once they have been enrolled in them. Students receiving a “C-“, “D+”’ “D”’ “D-“’ or an “F” must repeat the course(s) in each successive semester of enrollment at GWU, until they earn at least a grade of “C” (2.00). Students who fail to achieve at least a grade of “C” (2.00) in one of these courses after a maximum of four attempts will be dismissed from the University.
  2. The following guidelines apply to the foreign language requirement:
    1. Students must complete a foreign language through the first semester of the intermediate level (201). Students may select either from those offered by Gardner-Webb or any approved foreign language courses transferred from an accredited institution of higher learning. American Sign Language will be deemed a foreign language for purposes of this requirement.
    2. International students whose native language is a language other than English will not be required to complete additional courses in a foreign language other than English.
    3. Students may receive elective credit in a foreign language. Students receiving such credits will complete their foreign language requirements at or above the intermediate level. Students who place into a course above the elementary level of a particular language (201 or higher) will receive six semester hours of elective credit if they choose to complete six hours in that language. This elective credit does not apply for the minor or major.
    4. Deaf students who score intermediate level or higher on the SCPIASL will not be required to take additional foreign language courses.
  3. Computer literacy is a graduation requirement which may be met in one of three ways: by completing Gardner-Webb’s General Studies Curriculum (both English courses and the mathematics course); by completing a course, or courses, with a computer component (CSCI 160; PSYC 396; EDUC 301); or by making a passing score on a special test for computer literacy. See the Registrar for details.
  4. Each student is required to enroll for a Dimensions course each semester of full-time enrollment at Gardner-Webb or until a minimum of three semester hours of credit (six semesters) has been earned. Students who meet requirements earn 1/2 semester hour of credit each term. Part-time students must earn 1/2 semester hour of credit for every 15 hours of credit earned at Gardner-Webb or until a minimum of three semester hours of credit (six semesters) has been earned. (The required Dimensions courses are numbered 111-116; elective Dimensions courses are numbered 117-118.) Students receiving an F in Dimensions must repeat the course the following semester. Failure to receive a passing grade during the semester that the course is repeated will result in the student being placed on Dimensions probation and the student will remain on probation until the Dimensions requirement has been fulfilled. Students who fail Dimensions three semesters will be suspended from the University. In order to be reinstated, the student must register for and satisfactorily complete a Dimensions experience during any academic term.
  5. The last academic year (32 semester hours or more) must be taken at Gardner-Webb.
  6. Participation in commencement exercise is required. If a student is unable to participate in the Graduation Ceremony upon completion of degree requirements, the student must notify the Provost’s Office.
  7. Students must demonstrate competence in English, Reading and Mathematics prior to beginning General Studies courses in those areas.
  8. A minimum grade point average of 2.00 on a 4.00 scale based on the University grading system on all work attempted at Gardner-Webb is required for graduation.
  9. The student must have a minimum grade of “C’’ (2.00) on each course counted toward the major. A transfer student must complete at least one half of the major at Gardner-Webb.
  10. The student must also have an overall “C” (2.00) average on all work counted toward any minor. A transfer student must complete at least nine hours of the required minor at Gardner-Webb.
  11. Any student transferring from a two-year college must complete a minimum of 64 semester hours of subsequent study in senior colleges or universities.
  12. The Comprehensive Articulation Agreement. Students who began at a North Carolina community college in the 1997 Fall semester or later can meet Gardner-Webb’s general core requirements by completing the General Education Core and earning an Associate in Arts or an Associate in Science degree. However, courses in both Old and New Testament (RELI 101/304 and 102/305) must be taken as a part of the General Education Core or as electives at the community college, or the student will be required to take these courses at Gardner-Webb University. Students who graduated with an Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree from a North Carolina community college prior to 1997 or students who have out-of-state coursework accepted by a North Carolina community college will have their coursework examined on a course-by-course basis.

The General Education Core is a 44 semester hour core including the following areas (Grade of “C” (2.00) or better is required):


English Composition (6 semester hours)

 

Humanities/Fine Arts (12 semester hours)

Four courses from at least three of the following discipline areas are required: music, art, drama, dance, foreign languages, interdisciplinary humanities, literature, philosophy, and religion. At least one course must be a literature course.

 

Social/Behavioral Sciences (12 semester hours)

Four courses from at least three of the following discipline areas are required: anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, and sociology. At least one course must be a history course.

 

Natural Sciences (8 semester hours)

Associate in Arts: Two courses, including accompanying laboratory work, from the biological and physical science disciplines are required.

 

Associate in Science: A two-course sequence in general biology, general chemistry, or general physics is required.

 

Mathematics (6 semester hours)

Associate in Arts: At least one course in introductory mathematics is required; the other course may be selected from among other quantitative subjects, such as computer science and statistics.

 

Associate in Science: At least one course in mathematics at the precalculus algebra level or above is required; the other course may be a higher level mathematics course or may be selected from among other quantitative subjects, such as computer science and statistics.

 

Other Required Hours (20-21 semester hours)

Courses in health, physical education, college orientation, and/or study skills may be included as other required hours. Work experience may be included up to 1 semester hour for career exploration.

 

Associate in Arts: A minimum of 20 semester hours of college transfer general education, elective, and/or pre-major courses is required.

 

Associate in Science: A minimum of 14 semester hours of college transfer courses in mathematics, natural sciences, computer science, and/or other pre-major courses is required. The remaining hours may be selected from elective transfer courses.

 

Total Semester Hours Credit in Program: 64-65

 

All of the aforementioned stipulations must be completed PRIOR to entering Gardner-Webb University.

 

Participation in the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement does not preclude or negate minimum requirements specified by individual departments at Gardner-Webb University. Transfer students can review the departmental requirements under Additional General Education Courses Required by Major Department for specific courses required in the major.

 

12. The student is responsible for making official application for graduation to the Registrar by the deadlines published on the Registrar’s website www.gardner-webb.edu/registrar.

 

13. Students will complete the English requirement for graduation by registering for, and earning appropriate grades in, CRLT 101 (when required), ENGL 101 and 102, beginning with their first semester of enrollment and continuing uninterrupted until the requirements for graduation are satisfied. English 101 is prerequisite to English 102; English 101 and 102 are prerequisite to all other English courses except English 204. Permission to withdraw from English 101 or English 102 will be granted only under extraordinary circumstances. The permission of the Chair of the English department and the Associate Provost are required.

 

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

The student bears the final responsibility for the selection of a program of study and adherence to all published regulations and requirements of the University, including the preceding requirements for graduation.

 

ASSOCIATE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Gardner-Webb University offers an associate degree program in Nursing which requires a minimum of 72 semester hours for graduation. One semester hour of Dimensions for Nursing majors is required. No student may graduate with an associate degree with less than 64 semester hours, inclusive of specified Dimensions credit.

 

The student is required to take the final 24 semester hours at Gardner-Webb.

 

The student must have a minimum grade of “C’’ (2.00) on each course required in the major field. In Nursing, the student must have a minimum grade of “C” (2.00) on each nursing course and each science course.

 

A minimum grade point average of 2.00 on a 4.00 scale is required for graduation on all work attempted at Gardner-Webb.

 

The student bears the final responsibility for fulfilling all the requirements for the chosen degree program. It is the student’s responsibility to be familiar with the preceding requirements for graduation.

 

THE MAJOR

Each candidate for a baccalaureate degree must choose a major field of concentration. This selection must be made before entering the junior year. However, students in education, music, natural sciences, nursing, and world languages should begin their major in their freshman year. Requirements for each major are listed with the courses of instruction.

 

Registration of the intention to major with a particular department is required. A request is submitted to the chair of the department. The academic advising of all declared majors within a department is the responsibility of the chair. This responsibility may be delegated to any faculty member within that department for that period of time which best serves the interest of the student.

 

A student may elect to complete more than one major. To do this the student meets the requirements of a primary major plus 30 semester hours or more in a secondary field as approved by the departmental chair of the secondary major. No course may be counted in both majors. A student graduating with a double major receives only one degree, that of the primary major. However, the transcript denotes both primary and secondary majors. A transfer student must complete at least one half of the major(s) at Gardner-Webb.

 

THE MINOR

Most academic programs do not require a minor. However, a student in a program not requiring a minor may optionally pursue any minor offered by the University. A minimum of nine hours of the minor must be taken from Gardner-Webb University. Requirements for this minor may be fulfilled by satisfactory completion of an interdisciplinary minor of eighteen hours with at least nine hours in one discipline, selected by the student or recommended by the major department. Credit hours that are used by a student to fulfill the requirements of the university core curriculum cannot be used by that same student to fulfill the requirements of the interdisciplinary student minor unless approved by the Curriculum Committee. Advisement regarding minor requirements will be the responsibility of the department of the student’s major. Consultation with the chair of the minor is encouraged. Any deviation from catalog course requirements of a minor must be approved in advance by the chair or dean of the minor department or school and filed with the Degree Evaluator.

 

The minor field generally consists of 15-18 semester hours of academic work. A transfer student must complete at least nine hours of the minor at Gardner-Webb University. Requirements for each minor field are listed with the courses of instruction.

 

The following minor fields are available: American Sign Language, Art History, Biblical Languages, Biblical Studies, Biology, Business Administration, Chemistry, Christian History, Classical Languages, Communications Studies, Computer Science, Criminal Justice, Discipleship Studies, Education Studies, English, Environmental Science, French, General Science, Global Studies, Graphic Design, Health Science, History, Journalism, Mathematics, Military Science, Mission Studies, Music, Philosophy and Ethics, Photography, Physical Science, Political Science, Professional Education (available for areas of licensure only), Psychology, Public Relations, Recreation, Sign Language Interpreting, Social Sciences, Sociology, Spanish, Sport Management, Studio Art, Theater Arts, Video & Film, World Languages, World Religions, Writing, and Youth Discipleship Studies.

 

LEARNING ENRICHMENT AND ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

The Learning Enrichment and Assistance Program (LEAP) provides peer tutoring for students in subject areas with specific attention to courses found in the General Studies section of the curriculum. Students can make a peer tutoring appointment using an online form found through Student Services in MyWebb. Students may contact the Director of LEAP to determine if other course assistance is available by calling (704)406-4390. In addition, LEAP sponsors learning enrichment opportunities for students throughout the year.

 

DIMENSIONS

Dimensions is a series of programs offered for credit each fall and spring semester on a pass/fail basis. Dimensions supports the purpose of Gardner-Webb University, which includes a commitment to the Christian faith, the pursuit of intellectual and cultural fulfillment, and the fostering of a sense of community. Consequently, the three primary objectives of the Dimensions program are: 

 

  1. To provide opportunities for spiritual growth through worship experiences and programs of a religious nature, all in the context of Gardner-Webb University's commitment to the Christian faith.
  2. To enhance the academic program of the University by providing opportunities for intellectual and cultural enrichment, to include programs of an academic nature as well as dramatic, musical, and other cultural events.
  3. To promote a sense of community by regularly bringing together students, faculty, staff, and friends of the University. While all Dimensions events help to achieve this objective, the Fall University Convocation at the beginning of each academic year and the Annual Academic Awards Day in the Spring are examples of bringing the University family together for highly meaningful events.

 

Students who meet requirements earn 1/2 semester hour credit each term. Students will be administratively enrolled for the appropriate Dimensions section during each semester of full-time enrollment until a minimum of three semester hours of credit (six semesters) has been earned. Part-time students must earn .5 semester hour of credit for every 15 hours of credit earned at Gardner-Webb or until a minimum of three semester hours of credit has been earned. Transfer students must earn .5 semester hours of credit for every semester of enrollment until a minimum of three semester hours of credit (six semesters) has been earned or until they graduate, whichever comes first. Students receiving an "F" in Dimensions are required to repeat the course the following semester. Students who fail a second time will receive a letter of warning. Three grades of "F" in Dimensions will result in being placed on Dimensions probation. In order to be removed from Dimensions probation, the student must register for and satisfactorily complete both a Dimensions course by arrangement (20 hours of community service) and the regularly scheduled Dimensions during the following academic term. Students on probation who fail either the course by arrangement or the regularly scheduled Dimensions will be suspended from the University.

 

GENERAL ACADEMIC REGULATIONS, REGISTRATION AND COURSES

THE SEMESTER HOUR

The semester hour is the basic unit of credit awarded for progress toward a degree. Gardner-Webb University defines a semester hour as a reasonable approximation of the student learning outcomes that can be achieved in the context of a course which requires 42-45 hours of student work including both contact time between student and faculty and the student’s independent work. While hours of work and contact time can provide guidance in the establishment of semester hour equivalencies, it is understood that the student achievement associated with semester hours can only be measured adequately in terms of documented qualitative and quantitative outcomes. The successful completion of a semester hour will always take into consideration expectations based on degree level, discipline, the type of learning experience (e.g., didactic, clinical, practica or internships), and the mode of delivery (e.g., face-to-face or online). This definition is a minimum standard that does not restrict faculty from setting a higher standard that requires more student work per credit hour. This policy defines a semester hour at Gardner-Webb University in accordance with applicable federal regulations.

 

CLASSIFICATION

Classifications are made at the beginning of the academic year in August or at the time of the student’s enrollment.

 

A sophomore must have removed all entrance conditions and have completed 30 semester hours of work toward a degree.

 

A junior must have completed 60 semester hours, and a senior, 90 semester hours of credit toward a degree.

 

Special students include all persons enrolled at the University who are not seeking a degree.

 

COURSE LOAD

The unit of credit at Gardner-Webb University is the semester hour. A student is considered full-time if enrolled for 12 semester hours or more. The normal load is 16 semester hours. However, any student in good standing may take up to a maximum of 21.5 semester hours (the approval of Educational Policies and Standards Committee is required to exceed 21.5 semester hours). There are additional tuition charges when exceeding more than 18 hours per semester.

 

No boarding student may be enrolled for less than 12 semester hours at any time during a semester unless given prior permission by the Office of Residence Life.

 

The normal load for each term of summer school is 6 semester hours or a 4-semester-hour laboratory course plus one 3-semester-hour course.

 

COURSE REGISTRATION

Students register for classes online through MyWebb according to the posted schedule on the official Academic Calendar. Before registration, each student should consult with his or her academic adviser on course selection, General Studies requirements, major requirements and other degree requirements. However, it is the responsibility of the student, not the academic adviser, to ensure that all University graduation requirements are met. A student will not receive credit for any course for which registration has not been completed.

 

AUDITING COURSES

With the approval of the course professor, any Gardner-Webb University student may audit a course for a nominal charge. An Audit form must be completed and filed with the Registrar’s Office prior to the end of the Drop/Add period (first week of classes). Area residents not desiring credit may audit a course for a nominal charge provided an application is filed with the Admissions Office.

 

CHANGES IN CLASS AND SCHEDULE

The University reserves the right to cancel or discontinue any course because of insufficient enrollment or for other valid reasons. In order to assure quality instruction, the University reserves the right to close registration when the maximum enrollment has been reached, or to make changes in the schedule and/or faculty when necessary.

 

ADDING, DROPPING, AND WITHDRAWING FROM COURSES

The student’s schedule may be adjusted by adding and dropping courses with the approval of the academic adviser one week from the beginning of the fall or spring semester. Check the Academic Calendar for dates. Courses that are officially dropped by a student do not appear on a student’s transcript. If a student does not officially drop a class but never attends the class, a grade of @W will appear on the student’s transcript.

 

After the first week of classes, any official withdrawal from a class must be done by the student through the Registrar’s office. When a student officially withdraws from a course, a grade of “W’’ (withdrew) is recorded during the first four weeks of the fall and spring semesters, or during the first week of a summer term. After this period a “WP” (withdrew passing) or “WF” (withdrew failing) is assigned by the professor based upon an assessment of the student’s work to date in the course. No hours attempted are recorded for “W’’ and “WP” grades. Check the Academic Calendar for dates.

 

The last day for withdrawing from an individual course is four weeks after mid-term or a date not to exceed 75% of the course. Check the Academic Calendar for dates. After this date only a complete withdrawal from school will be processed.

 

INDEPENDENT STUDY

The term “independent study” is reserved for those courses specifically designed as guided reading and/or for student-initiated research that includes a written project/paper.

 

Independent study requires junior, senior, or graduate standing and the approval of the following: the professor offering the study, the student’s major department/school, and the appropriate Associate Provost. The student’s proposal must be submitted and approved by the end of the semester preceding the study. An independent study will not be used to repeat a course and is restricted to a degree or licensure-seeking student in a Gardner-Webb University program of study. No more than six hours credit in independent study may be applied toward graduation requirements. No more than three hours of independent study can be taken in any one semester.

 

COURSE BY ARRANGEMENT

A course by arrangement is restricted to a degree or licensure-seeking student in a Gardner-Webb University program of student (i.e., is not a transient student) and a catalog course which is not offered by the University during a given semester or which cannot be scheduled by the student. The course may be offered to the student on a one-to-one basis, provided the option is limited to instances of extenuating circumstances.

 

Course by Arrangement requires junior, senior, or graduate standing and the approval of the following: the professor offering the study, the student’s major department/school, and the appropriate Associate Provost. A Course by Arrangement must be scheduled before the end of the drop/add period of each semester. It will not be used to repeat a course. No more than two Courses by Arrangement may be applied toward graduation requirements. No more than one Course by Arrangement can be taken in any one semester.

 

REPEAT COURSES

Only courses with a grade of “C-”, “D+”, “D”, “D-”, “F”, “@F” or “WF” may be repeated. A student may repeat up to six courses in which a “C-”, “D+”, “D”, “F”, “D-”, “@F”, or “WF” were earned to improve grades for GPA purposes. Beginning with the seventh, all repeat attempts will be counted in the GPA. Multiple repeats of the same course will count toward the six allowed. In the repeat of the first six courses, only the higher grade will be counted in computing the Gardner-Webb overall grade point average, although the lower grade remains on the official transcript. Transfer credit may not be used to repeat a “C-”, “D+”, “D”, “D-”, “F”, “@F” or “WF” earned in a Gardner-Webb course. University policy on repeating courses is not applicable in a situation where an “Fx” was assigned because of academic dishonesty. An “Fx” that is assigned as a penalty for academic dishonesty will remain a part of the academic transcript. It cannot be removed by a course repeat and will be factored into the grade point average.

 

ATTENDANCE

CLASS ATTENDANCE

Regular class attendance is an important student obligation. Students are responsible for all course work conducted in class meetings whether or not they are present. Because learning is a communal experience, the physical presence of students is required in class for at least 75% of class meetings. Attendance is counted from the first scheduled class meeting. Failure to meet this attendance requirement will result in loss of credit for the course and a grade of “@F” will be recorded on a student’s transcript. Furthermore, it is the prerogative of the professor to set a more stringent class attendance policy. During the first week of the semester the professor will clearly state, in writing, the attendance policy which will govern the class. Students are responsible for knowing the number of absences that they accumulate.

 

Absence from class does not excuse the student from responsibility for class work. Planned class absences for foreseeable personal circumstances or official University business must be negotiated with the professor prior to the absence.

 

ABSENCE FROM TESTS AND EXAMINATIONS

Students who miss scheduled tests and examinations without excusable reasons may not make up such assignments. Authorization to make up tests missed for excusable reasons is obtained from the course professor.

 

HONOR CODE

Gardner-Webb University students are pledged to uphold honesty, integrity, and truthfulness in all realms of University life. The Student Government Association requires all students to sign the Honor Code Form as they begin their stay at Gardner-Webb. This signed form is kept in the Office of the Vice President and Dean of Student Development.

 

POLICY OF ACADEMIC HONESTY

Preamble

As a community of scholars founded upon the ideals of Christianity, Gardner-Webb University expects its students to develop and display a strong sense of academic integrity. As in any community, this institution must be governed by regulations; and like the laws of any community, these rules function best when they are fully understood, accepted and cherished by each and every individual member of the community. Therefore, all students and faculty members are expected to be familiar with and to base their actions upon the following statements regarding academic honesty.

 

Student Responsibilities

 

  1. Students should recognize that the regulations governing academic integrity exist for the protection of the honest and that dishonesty in an academic setting must not be tolerated, much less condoned.
  2. Students are responsible for their own work. Any assignment turned in by a student is assumed to be the work of the student whose name appears on the assignment.
  3. Students are ultimately responsible for understanding a faculty member’s instructions for any assignment. If instructions are not clear, students must seek clarification from the instructor.
  4. Students must understand the definitions of plagiarism and academic dishonesty.
  5. Students should familiarize themselves with the proper use of citations and quotations in order to avoid accidentally passing someone else’s work off as their own.
  6. Students are expected to report incidence of academic dishonesty to their professor.
  7. Any student who threatens or coerces another student or faculty member for reporting an Honor Code violation will face disciplinary action, with expulsion being the recommended punishment.

Repeating Courses in which Academic Dishonesty Occurred:

 

Students are allowed to retake courses that they fail due to academic dishonesty; however, the course hours attempted will continue to be calculated in figuring the student’s grade point average.

 

* For more information on the Academic Honesty Policy and Procedures, see the current Student Handbook.

 

GRADES AND REPORTS

GRADING SYSTEM AND QUALITY POINTS

 

Graduation is dependent upon quality as well as upon quantity of work done.

 

A student earns quality points as well as semester hours credit if the level of performance does not fall below that of “D-”.

 

Letter grades are assigned. They are interpreted in the table below, with the quality points for each hour of credit shown at the right.

 

GradesHours Attempted Per Credit HourQuality Points Per Credit Hour
A+14
A14
A-13.67
B+13.33
B13
B-12.67
C+12.33
C12
C-11.67
D+11.33
D11
D-1.67
F10
FX- Failure for Academic Dishonesty10
FD- Dimensions Failure00
P- Passing (With Approval)00
I- Incomplete10
IN- Incomplete (With Approval)00
W- Withdrew00
WP- Withdrew Passing00
WF- Withdrew Failing10
@F- Administrative Failure10
@W- Administrative Withdrawal (Student never attended)00
NG- No Grade Reported00
TR- Transfer HoursHours Credit OnlyHours Credit Only
CR- Credit HoursHours Credit OnlyHours Credit Only
AU- Auditor00
E- Course Repeated00
I- Later or Higher Attempt Computed According to Grade1Multiplied by quality points For final grade


An “I” grade may be assigned only when a small amount of coursework (i.e., test, project, research paper, or final exam) is not complete. The reason for the incomplete work must be of a serious nature and must be beyond the student’s control. The assigning of an “I” grade must be accompanied by the completion of an “I” grade contract, with one copy given to the student, one kept on file by the professor, and one submitted to the Office of Associate Provosts within seven days after grades are submitted. The final date for completion of coursework and removal of an “I” grade can be no later than 90 days after the last day of the term in which the “I” grade was assigned; otherwise the incomplete grade will be changed to a grade of “F” by the Registrar’s Office.

 

An “IN” is assigned to a student involved in an internship or other multisemester course structures in which the final assessment cannot be determined by the end point of the registered term. The student has a maximum deadline of the end of the following semester to complete the course work (this may vary by program in the graduate schools); otherwise the incomplete grade will be automatically changed to an “F” by the Registrar’s Office. While in effect, the “IN” will have no negative bearing on the student’s semester and cumulative grade-point average.

 

A “W” will be assigned when a student withdraws from a course during the first four weeks of the semester. After the first four weeks of the semester, a “WF” or “WP” is assigned by the professor based upon the professor’s assessment of the student’s work at the date of withdrawal.

 

A student who withdraws from a course after the drop/add period must withdraw directly through the Registrar’s Office. The student is responsible for carrying out the withdrawal and must secure written documentation of the withdrawal. A student who calls the Registrar’s Office to withdraw from a course should request that documentation be sent to him or her by hard copy in the mail or by email.

 

The last date for withdrawing from an individual course will be four weeks after mid-term or a date not to exceed 75% of the course (including summer school). The only courses which will be dropped after this date are those which a student drops when withdrawing from school.

 

Once a grade has been submitted to the Registrar, it cannot be changed except in the event of a clerical error or an error in calculation, or as a result of an academic appeal (see the section below titled “Academic Appeals”). Unless a grade of “I” or “IN” has been assigned, a professor cannot accept coursework from a student after a grade has been submitted.

 

Under no circumstances will a grade be changed, after having been reported to the Registrar, without the approval of the appropriate Associate Provost.

 

GRADE POINT AVERAGE

The student’s general academic performance is indicated by both a semester and a cumulative grade-point average. This figure is determined by dividing attempted semester hours into earned quality points. Both values are calculated based only on academic work completed at Gardner-Webb.

 

GRADE REPORTS

Each student receives a course grade at the end of the semester. Final grades can be accessed by going online at mywebb.gardner-webb.edu.

 

HONORS AND AWARDS

SEMESTER HONORS

Two lists of honor students are posted each semester:

 

1. Dean’s List: Students enrolled for a minimum of 12 hours and fewer than 15 must have a 4.0 Gardner-Webb Grade Point Average, and students taking 15 hours or more must have a 3.7 or better with no grade below “C” (2.00).

 

2. Honor Roll: Students enrolled for a minimum of 12 hours and fewer than 15 must have a 3.5 Gardner-Webb Grade Point Average with no grade below “C” (2.00), and students taking 15 or more hours must have a 3.2 but less than a 3.7 with no grade below “C” (2.00).

 

ANNUAL AWARDS

Annual awards are made to outstanding students in many individual disciplines, and the student with the highest academic record in each of the four classes receives an award. Senior awards are made at the Spring Commencement. Other class awards are made at Fall Convocation.

 

The Most Outstanding Male Graduate Award is endowed by Dr. John Roberts of Greenville, SC. Dr. Roberts received the award when he graduated from Gardner-Webb in 1949. The award perpetuates the memory of Professor J. D. Huggins, the first principal of the Boiling Springs High School. The award recognizes scholarship and participation in University activities.

 

The Most Outstanding Female Graduate Award is provided by Mrs. Bonnie R. Price in memory of Miss Etta L. Curtis. The award recognizes scholarship and participation in University activities.

 

The winners of these awards are selected by the faculty.

 

GRADUATION HONORS

To be considered for baccalaureate honors, a graduating student must complete a minimum of 64 hours at Gardner-Webb University, and his or her GPA for that work taken here must merit honors. Those in the upper 12% of the graduating class will receive honors. One-sixth of those so designated will graduate summa cum laude; one-third will graduate magna cum laude; and one-half will graduate cum laude. This standard will be applied to graduates in each of the following categories: Arts/Sciences, Elementary Education, Day Business, GOAL Arts/Sciences, and GOAL Business. This provision has applied since the Spring 1994.

 

Associate degree students whose overall GPA and Gardner-Webb GPA are 3.2 or more are designated as Honor Students.

 

HONORS PROGRAM

Gardner-Webb University provides a comprehensive Honors Program to nurture academically qualified students in all majors. Emphasis is placed on Honors classes, leadership through their academic and co-curricular accomplishments, preparation for graduate school, and special activities. Students who participate in the Honors Program, complete a minimum of 24 semester hours of Honors courses, and receive the recommendation of the Honors faculty will receive “Honors Program” recognition during commencement exercises.

 

STUDENT ACCESS TO EDUCATIONAL RECORDS

Gardner-Webb University complies with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974. This Act is designed to protect the privacy of educational records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review their educational records, and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings. Students also have the right to file complaints with The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with the Act.

 

Institutional policy explains in detail the procedures to be used by the institution for compliance with the provisions of the Act. Copies of the policy can be found in the Office of the Registrar. That office also maintains a Directory of Records which lists all student educational records maintained by this institution. Information known as Directory Information will be published unless the student specifically requests the Registrar’s Office withhold this information. Directory Information is defined as the following: student name, local and permanent addresses, telephone numbers, date of birth, major(s), dates of attendance, previous educational institutions attended, and degree and awards received.

 

Questions concerning the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act may be referred to the Office of the Registrar. FERPA Consent Form to Release Student Information is available on the Registrar’s website.

 

Students may grant permission to University personnel to release to specified individuals information pertaining to Academic Records, Financial Aid, and Billing by completing the FERPA Release Form located on their Personal Information menu on MyWebb. Using this form, students are able to specify up to three individuals to whom information may be released.

 

TRANSCRIPTS OF STUDENT RECORDS

Requests for copies of a student’s record should be made to the Office of the Registrar. All transcripts will reflect the student’s complete academic record. No transcripts will be issued without the written authorization of the student. No transcript will be issued for a student who has a financial obligation to the University.

 

TRANSIENT CREDIT

Students who wish to insure that courses taken at other accredited institutions during a regular term or summer session are applicable for Gardner-Webb credit must complete a “Request to Recognize Transient Credit” form. This form must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office no later than the last class day of the semester prior to the requested semester of study.

 

Transient credit requests will be considered only for students who are in good academic standing at the University, and thus may not be used to improve academic standing at Gardner-Webb.

 

The following restrictions apply to the approval of transient credit.

 

Transient credit

  1. will be awarded only for courses that are applicable toward graduation at the host institution,
  2. will be awarded only for courses in which a grade of “C” (2.0) or better is earned,
  3. will not be awarded for courses for which a student has previously earned credit at Gardner-Webb,
  4. may not be used to repeat a “C-”, “D+”, “D”, “D-”, or “F” earned in a Gardner-Webb course.
  5. Payment of processing fee.

Transient credit requests will not automatically be approved for students in their final year of study at Gardner-Webb (the final 24 hours for a student enrolled in the AS Degree in Nursing Program and the final 32 hours for a student seeking either the BS or BA degree). Students requesting transient credit during this time frame must have the approval of the appropriate Associate Provost. In addition to the “Request to Recognize Transient Credit” form, the “Request to Waive 24/32 Hour Rule” form must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office at least two weeks before the last class day of the semester prior to the requested semester of study.

 

In order to insure that transient credit is properly documented, the student must request that an official transcript from the host institution be forwarded to the Gardner-Webb Registrar. For a student taking transient credit during the final semester of study, all such transcripts must be on file in the Registrar’s Office prior to that semester’s commencement ceremonies. Transient transcripts not received by this deadline will cause the student’s graduation date to be delayed.

 

CHALLENGE EXAMINATION POLICY

A challenge examination is an in-depth and comprehensive assessment of the student’s ability to answer questions on course content. An acceptable grade on the examination will permit the student to receive credit for the course.

 

To request the opportunity to take a challenge examination, the student must present, in writing, justification for such an examination to the dean of the school or chair of the department in which the course is offered.

 

The dean of the school or chair of the department will appoint a committee to review the request. If the request is approved, the dean or chair will appoint the examining professor or committee and inform the business office that, prior to taking the exam, the student should be charged an examination fee of $100.00 per credit hour.

 

If the examination results are acceptable, the examining professor or committee will report the results, via the Certification of Successful Challenge Examination form, to the dean of the school or chair of the department. That dean or chair will send a copy of the form to the Registrar, who will credit the student with the appropriate number of hours for the course. No grade will be assigned or averaged into the quality point average.

 

ACADEMIC APPEALS

A student who has a question about an academic decision should consult the University official responsible for the decision. If the matter is not resolved to the student's satisfaction, the student may appeal in the following order to the next highest level in the appropriate chain of responsibility: professor, department chair or dean, Associate Provost, and the Educational Policies and Standards Committee (EPSC). Decisions of the EPSC are final and cannot be further appealed. Except for grade appeals, the student must make all appeals in writing on his or her own behalf no more than eighteen months after the date of the decision being appealed.

 

A student who has a question about a grade should consult the professor as soon as possible. A student who believes a grade to be inaccurate or unfair may appeal to the professor, department chair or dean, Associate Provost, and the Educational Policies and Standards Committee, in that order. Decisions of the EPSC are final and cannot be further appealed. The last date to initiate a grade appeal is the end of the next fall or spring semester. Email notification of approved and processed grade changes will be sent to the student, the professor, and the advisor.

 

Academic Appeal Filing Forms may be obtained from the Office of Associate Provosts (102 Webb Hall, Phone 704-406-3522). The appeal document should include the student's local or permanent address, University email address, student ID number, and a current phone number where he or she may be reached. All appeals should be signed and dated. Appeals made on behalf of the student by another party (e.g. faculty, official of the institution, another student, or a parent) will be dismissed. Supporting documentation submitted by a member of the faculty or administration to augment or clarify the student's appeal is welcome and will be given full consideration.

 

ACADEMIC STANDARDS AND WITHDRAWAL

RETAINING MEMBERSHIP IN THE STUDENT BODY

Students once admitted to the University who meet all requirements for continuing enrollment are considered members of the student body. However, it is the policy of the University to require each registered student to annually reaffirm the desire and intention to retain membership in the student body. Completing or updating a Housing or Commuter Contract is required during the Spring Semester. Advance deposits are required each semester as indicated in the financial section.

 

RETENTION STANDARDS

Standards for acceptable academic progress at Gardner-Webb University are set to assist students in assessing the quality of their performance. Academic probation and suspension are used to alert students to potentially serious academic difficulty in their progress toward degrees.

 

Students are placed on academic probation as a warning that their academic performance is below the minimum level expected of students in their class. If the student’s academic performance fails to reach the minimum standard for continued enrollment in the ensuing semester, he/she will be suspended from the University.

 

Students will be placed on probation when their Gardner-Webb grade point average falls below the minimum standards listed below:

 

Freshmen 0 to 29 hours 1.5

Sophomores 30 to 59 hours 1.7

Juniors 60 to 89 hours 1.9

Seniors 90 hours and above 2.0

 

A student placed on academic probation remains on probation for the entire semester and may not register for more than 15.5 credit hours during any semester while on probation.

 

In order to be removed from academic probation, the student’s Gardner-Webb GPA must return to the appropriate minimum standard. If the student fails to bring the grade point average to a satisfactory level during the probationary semester but the semester’s GPA is at or above the minimum required, probation will be continued for another semester.

 

If at any time while on academic probation the student’s semester GPA and Gardner-Webb GPA fall below the minimum requirement, the student will be suspended for one semester. After the one-semester suspension a student desiring readmission must submit a formal application for readmission. If approved, the student may register for classes and will be automatically placed on academic probation.

 

Should a second or third academic suspension occur (even if the first or second suspension is waived on appeal), the student must remain out for at least two semesters. After a two-semester suspension from the University, the student must submit a formal application for readmission. If approved, the student may register for classes and will be automatically placed on academic probation.

 

Readmission requires the approval of the Readmission Committee. Students suspended from the University are not automatically reinstated upon reapplication. A student who wishes to appeal the denial of reinstatement may do so through a written appeal to the Provost. A student who wishes to appeal being placed on academic probation or suspension may do so through the Office of the Provost. Suspensions that are waived on appeal are still noted on the student’s academic transcript.

 

All full-time students are eligible to represent the institution in all extracurricular activities, unless prohibited for disciplinary reasons. Students on either academic or disciplinary suspension are not allowed to participate in dramatic, musical, athletic, or other practice sessions since they are not to represent the University or participate in the public performance of such events.

 

Summer study at Gardner-Webb University may be used to improve one’s academic standing. A student’s academic standing can be affected as a result of summer school enrollment. Students who are on academic probation or suspension may not use study at another institution to improve their Gardner-Webb academic standing.

 

See page 40 - “Readmission of Former Students” – for policies concerning students seeking readmission after leaving Gardner-Webb University while on probation or suspension.

 

WITHDRAWAL, SUSPENSION AND EXPULSION

Voluntary termination of enrollment during the course of a semester or summer term is defined as withdrawal. Dismissal from school for a specified period of time is defined as suspension, and expulsion is dismissal for an unspecified period of time. The University reserves the right to suspend or expel any student or students when it believes that such action is in the best interest of the institution and/or the student(s). This action will take place only after careful consideration and consultation with the student or students in question and all other parties with information pertinent to the matter at hand.

 

Any student leaving school before the end of a term is required to secure a withdrawal form from the Registrar’s Office, complete it in full, and return it to the Registrar’s Office. Honorable withdrawal is granted only if these procedures are followed. Failure to complete this procedure will result in grades of “@F” on all coursework.

 

MEDICAL WITHDRAWAL

Any registered student who experiences medical trauma or a chronic illness that may prevent completing the semester may apply for a medical withdrawal from the University. A medical withdrawal request must be filed with the Registrar’s Office prior to the start of final exams and must include documentation submitted from a physician or psychologist trained in the diagnosis of the medical condition.

 

A qualifying medical condition, as determined by the physician or psychologist, must prevent the student from participating in all classes remaining during the current semester. A medical withdrawal is a complete withdrawal from the University. The supporting documentation from a physician or psychologist accompanying the medical withdrawal request must be submitted on official letterhead from the physician or psychologist and must be addressed to the Gardner-Webb University Registrar. The medical documentation must also include the physician or psychologist’s name, title, professional credentials, license and certification number, and should address the following:

 

  1. Specific diagnoses and findings;
  2. Date the examination, assessment, or evaluation was performed;
  3. In the event that the medical withdrawal is the result of an injury or accident, the date the injury or accident occurred;
  4. In the event the medical withdrawal is due to chronic illness, the date the illness made it necessary to stop attending classes.

A student will be notified of the approval decision following a review of the medical documentation. If the request is approved, the student will receive a final grade of “W” for each class (except in instances of Academic Dishonesty).

 

Upon medical withdrawal from the University, a student must apply for readmission to the University to continue studies. The student must provide documentation from the same physician or psychologist, when possible, stating the student is able to continue academic studies at the University. This documentation should follow the same format as above.