Course Catalog

DCP Course Descriptions

Broyhill School of Undergraduate Management

 

Accounting

ACC 213 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES I

3 semester hours

An introduction to financial accounting. Accounting transactions, the accounting cycle, financial statement preparation. Special issues for short- and long-term assets, liabilities, partnerships, and corporations.

ACC 214 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES II

3 semester hours

Continued coverage of financial accounting. Partnerships, corporations, debt and equity financing. Cash flow and financial statement analysis. Introduction to management accounting: job-order and process costing, budgeting and variance analysis.

Prerequisite: ACC 213 or permission of the instructor.

ACC 313 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I

3 semester hours

Detailed study of financial and managerial accounting concepts. Financial statement preparation. Time value of money. Cost allocation and valuation of current and long-term assets. Financial reporting and analysis.

Prerequisite: Two courses in accounting principles.

ACC 314 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II

3 semester hours

Continued study of financial and managerial accounting concepts. Current and long-term debt issues, contributed and earned equity. Financial reporting and analysis.

Prerequisite: ACC 313.

ACC 315, COST ACCOUNTING

3 semester hours

Cost accounting measurement and classification. Job order and process costing. Budget development using variable and fixed costs. Capital budgeting and project evaluation.

Prerequisite: Two courses in accounting principles.

ACC 400, ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS

3 semester hours

In addition to an in-depth investigation of the automation and technology associated with the accounting function. Students will develop a proficiency with a recognized accounting software package.

Prerequisite: ACC 214 and CIS 300.

ACC 425, FEDERAL INCOME TAX I

3 semester hours

Examines introductory federal income tax provisions and compliance from an individual income tax perspective, emphasizing the business implications of individual tax law.

Prerequisite: ACC 214

ACC 426, FEDERAL INCOME TAX II

3 semester hours

Examines introductory federal income tax provisions and compliance from a corporate perspective emphasizing the multidisciplinary aspects of taxation with a focus on the model tax curriculum of the AICPA.

Prerequisite: ACC 214 and ACC 425.

 

ACC 430 FORENSIC ACCOUNTING

3 semester hours


This course will provide an overview for the understanding of forensic techniques and fraud examination methodology.  The course will include the study of schemes used by executives, managers, employees and other stakeholders to commit fraud against their organizations.  It will cover prevention, detection and investigative strategies for businesses, nonprofit entities and governmental functions.  Prerequisite: ACCT (ACC) 213 and 214 or permission of the instructor.

ACC 435, ADVANCED ACCOUNTING

3 semester hours

Accounting for partnerships, insurance, corporate consolidations, and government.

Prerequisite: ACC 314

ACC 450, AUDITING

3 semester hours

Principles, techniques, procedures, and legal responsibility of auditors.

Prerequisite: ACC 314

BAD 300, LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS

3 semester hours

The course is designed to cover both the public and private regulation of business. Some of the topics covered are tort law, contract law, agency, partnerships, and corporations.

BAD 304, APPLIED BUSINESS STATISTICS

3 semester hours

The course considers the use of statistics in business for better planning, control and decision making with the focus on using computer statistical software, interpretation and presentation of results. Descriptive and inferential statistics, probability concepts, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance and regression analysis are covered.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 316 or equivalent, Computer Information Systems 300 or equivalent or
permission of the instructor.

BAD 305, QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR BUSINESS

3 semester hours

Explores the use of quantitative methods for decision analysis. Topics include linear programming, sensitivity analysis, integer and goal programming, queuing models and simulation.

Prerequisite: College course work in algebra or MTH 300 with a 2.0 or better, BAD 304, CIS 300

BAD 312, FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

3 semester hours

Designed to provide students with a broad base of understanding of the principles and concepts of corporate financial decision making. The course covers the key financial issues of corporate ethics, time, value of money, valuation of stocks and bonds, risk and return, cost of capital, capital budgeting, leverage and capital structure, and financial statement analysis.

Prerequisite: ACC 213, 214, ECO 203, and ECO 204.

BAD 318, PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING

3 semester hours

A comprehensive analysis of the marketing system and the marketing process.

BAD 360, INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

3 semester hours

An introduction to the unique issues associated with doing business in a global context. Specific challenges of doing business internationally and related managerial strategies are examined.

BAD 480, SENIOR SEMINAR IN BUSINESS: BUSINESS POLICY

3 semester hours

A case study approach designed to apply areas of management, accounting, finance, and economics to contemporary business problems.

Prerequisite: ACC 214, BAD 304, BAD 305, CIS 300, ECO 204, BAD 312, BAD 318, senior standing

CIS 300 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

3 semester hours

A general introduction to management information systems theories and concepts, including the organizational role of information systems, prevalent information and communication technologies, and information systems development processes, with an emphasis on tools such as Excel.

ECO 203 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I (ECONOMICS AND THE FREE MARKET SYSTEM)

3 semester hours

Explores the economic implications, history and philosophy of the free enterprise system with special attention to national income theory; money, banking and the Federal Reserve system; Keynesian and Classical theories and the mechanics of the business cycle.

ECO 204 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS II

3 semester hours

Study of microeconomic concepts, price theory, behavior of the firm, market structure, and income distribution.

Prerequisite: ECO 203

MGT 316, PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT

3 semester hours

Explores the principles and processes of managing an organization. The functions of planning, organizing, leading, and motivating employees are applied to current business situations.


Business Administration

ACC 213 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES I

3 semester hours

An introduction to financial accounting. Accounting transactions, the accounting cycle, financial statement preparation. Special issues for short- and long-term assets, liabilities, partnerships, and corporations.

ACC 214 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES II

3 semester hours

Continued coverage of financial accounting. Partnerships, corporations, debt and equity financing. Cash flow and financial statement analysis. Introduction to management accounting: job-order and process costing, budgeting and variance analysis.

Prerequisite: ACC 213 or permission of the instructor.

BAD 300, LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS

3 semester hours

The course is designed to cover both the public and private regulation of business. Some of the topics covered are tort law, contract law, agency, partnerships, and corporations.

BAD 312, FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

3 semester hours

Designed to provide students with a broad base of understanding of the principles and concepts of corporate financial decision making. The course covers the key financial issues of corporate ethics, time, value of money, valuation of stocks and bonds, risk and return, cost of capital, capital budgeting, leverage and capital structure, and financial statement analysis.

Prerequisite: ACC 213, 214, ECO 203, and ECO 204.

BAD 318, PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING

3 semester hours

A comprehensive analysis of the marketing system and the marketing process.

BAD 325, BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS APPLICATIONS

3 semester hours

Emphasis on business analysis, report writing, formal and informal presentations, public relations, and internal and external communications.

BAD 340, INTEGRATION OF FAITH AND BUSINESS

3 semester hours

This elective course will explore the interplay between faith and business. Various models of integration at the personal and corporate level will be explored. Students will be challenged to develop their own philosophy of how faith makes a difference in their approach to business. In addition to traditional business ethics topics, this course will explore personal morality, the unique implications of the Christian faith to various business disciplines, and business as service.

Prerequisite: Junior or senior level status.

BAD 360, INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

3 semester hours

An introduction to the unique issues associated with doing business in a global context. Specific challenges of doing business internationally and related managerial strategies are examined.

BAD 480, SENIOR SEMINAR IN BUSINESS: BUSINESS POLICY

3 semester hours

A case study approach designed to apply areas of management, accounting, finance, and economics to contemporary business problems.

Prerequisite: ACC 214, BAD 304, BAD 305, cis 300, ECO 204, BAD 312, BAD 318, senior standing

CIS 300 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

3 semester hours

A general introduction to management information systems theories and concepts, including the organizational role of information systems, prevalent information and communication technologies, and information systems development processes, with an emphasis on tools such as Excel.

ECO 203 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I (ECONOMICS AND THE FREE MARKET SYSTEM)

3 semester hours

Explores the economic implications, history and philosophy of the free enterprise system with special attention to national income theory; money, banking and the Federal Reserve system; Keynesian and Classical theories and the mechanics of the business cycle.

ECO 204 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS II

3 semester hours

Study of microeconomic concepts, price theory, behavior of the firm, market structure, and income distribution.

Prerequisite: ECO 203

MGT 316, PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT

3 semester hours

Explores the principles and processes of managing an organization. The functions of planning, organizing, leading, and motivating employees are applied to current business situations.

MGT 400, HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

3 semester hours

Principles and practices regarding the recruitment, selection, development, evaluation, compensation, and proper recognition of employees within organizations.

Prerequisite: All business majors must complete MGT 316

MGT 403, HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN ORGANIZATIONS

3 semester hours

The application of human behavior principles common to many types of organizations, specifically business and industry. Motivation, leadership, followership, and human problems are analyzed.

Prerequisite: All business majors must complete MGT 316.

MGT 410, ENTREPRENEURSHIP

3 semester hours

A practical course designed to familiarize the student with the application of economic and managerial techniques of the small business. These techniques include entrepreneurship, location analysis, forms of ownership, financing alternatives, accounting practice, marketing and advertising techniques, and inventory control.

Prerequisite: MGT 316

MGT 416, PRODUCTION AND OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

3 semester hours

Explores the management concerns of cost, quality, and quantity in the production systems of manufacturing companies, material requirements, planning, break-even charts, plant location, present worth analysis, safety, job enrichment, and sequential sampling.

Prerequisite: BAD 304, BAD 305, MGT 316.

MGT 466, INTERNATIONAL MARKETING

3 semester hours

Explores the cultural, marketing, management, and environmental factors of the multinational organization. Case analysis is utilized with emphasis toward problem resolution.

Prerequisite: BAD 318

MGT 485, LEADERSHIP

3 semester hours

Includes the definition, traits, and segmentations of leadership. Investigates character as a foundation and similar leadership traits. Mistakes that leaders make, and new demands on future leaders are analyzed through group evaluations and discussions of current and historic leaders.

Prerequisite: All business majors must complete MGT 316


Computer Information Systems

ACC 213 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES I

3 semester hours

An introduction to financial accounting. Accounting transactions, the accounting cycle, financial statement preparation. Special issues for short- and long-term assets, liabilities, partnerships, and corporations.

ACC 214 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES II

3 semester hours

Continued coverage of financial accounting. Partnerships, corporations, debt and equity financing. Cash flow and financial statement analysis. Introduction to management accounting: job-order and process costing, budgeting and variance analysis.

Prerequisite: ACC 213 or permission of the instructor.

ACC 400, ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS

3 semester hours

In addition to an in-depth investigation of the automation and technology associated with the accounting function. Students will develop a proficiency with a recognized accounting software package.

Prerequisite: ACC 214 and CIS 300.

BAD 300, LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS

3 semester hours

The course is designed to cover both the public and private regulation of business. Some of the topics covered are tort law, contract law, agency, partnerships, and corporations.

BAD 304, APPLIED BUSINESS STATISTICS

3 semester hours

The course considers the use of statistics in business for better planning, control and decision making with the focus on using computer statistical software, interpretation and presentation of results. Descriptive and inferential statistics, probability concepts, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance and regression analysis are covered.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 316 or equivalent, Computer Information Systems 300 or equivalent or
permission of the instructor.

BAD 305, QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR BUSINESS

3 semester hours

Explores the use of quantitative methods for decision analysis. Topics include linear programming, sensitivity analysis, integer and goal programming, queuing models and simulation.

Prerequisite: College course work in algebra or MTH 300 with a 2.0 or better, BAD 304, CIS 300

BAD 312, FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

3 semester hours

Designed to provide students with a broad base of understanding of the principles and concepts of corporate financial decision making. The course covers the key financial issues of corporate ethics, time, value of money, valuation of stocks and bonds, risk and return, cost of capital, capital budgeting, leverage and capital structure, and financial statement analysis.

Prerequisite: ACC 213, 214, ECO 203, and ECO 204.

BAD 318, PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING

3 semester hours

A comprehensive analysis of the marketing system and the marketing process.

BAD 360, INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

3 semester hours

An introduction to the unique issues associated with doing business in a global context. Specific challenges of doing business internationally and related managerial strategies are examined.

BAD 480, SENIOR SEMINAR IN BUSINESS: BUSINESS POLICY

3 semester hours

A case study approach designed to apply areas of management, accounting, finance, and economics to contemporary business problems.

Prerequisite: ACC 214, BAD 304, BAD 305, cis 300, ECO 204, BAD 312, BAD 318, senior standing

CIS 300 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

3 semester hours

A general introduction to management information systems theories and concepts, including the organizational role of information systems, prevalent information and communication technologies, and information systems development processes, with an emphasis on tools such as Excel.

CIS 371 SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN

3 semester hours

Study of the systems development life cycle (SDLC) with focus on the planning, analysis, and design processes. Emphasis is placed on the design and development systems, including the software and databases that are needed to support the business needs of organizations.

Prerequisite: CIS 300

 

CIS 375 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER AND NETWORK SECURITY

3 semester hours

The study of computing security vulnerabilities and techniques and tools for developing secure applications and practicing safe computing.

Prerequisite: CIS 201

CIS 423 SURVEY OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES

3 semester hours

Introduction to the history and design of programming languages. The applicability of special languages to special uses such as Fortran, Pascal, Ada, Oberon, Object Pascal, C++, Smalltalk. Examination of the modern concepts of object-orientation and functional programming.

Prerequisite: CIS 201, CIS 300

CIS 432 INFORMATION SYSTEMS PROJECT MANAGEMENT

3 semester hours

This course examines the characteristics of information technology projects, especially involving the development of software-intensive systems, and introduces the student to a variety of project management techniques.

Prerequisite: CIS 300

CIS 433 DATABASE MANAGEMENT

3 semester hours

Beginning and intermediate topics in data modeling for relational database management systems. Major emphasis is placed on understanding the various database management functions and providing database support for organizations.

Prerequisite: CIS 300

CIS 460 DATA COMMUNICATIONS AND NETWORKING

3 semester hours

Introduction to concepts of computer network operating systems, telephony, routing, packets, and distributed processing.

Prerequisite: CIS 300

CIS 470 STRATEGIC INFORMATION MANAGEMENT

3 semester hours

Prepares the student to develop an understanding and appreciation for the impact of information systems on the economy and business performance, emerging public technology infrastructure and its role in the modern organization, electronic business applications, and technology-driven business models and strategies. (Capstone Course)

Prerequisite: CIS Major, CIS 300 and Senior status.

CIS 471 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

3 semester hours

The study of structured programming, systems analysis, and systems design techniques. Topics include top-down design, software design metrics, project management, program correctness, and the use of computer-aided software engineering (CASE) and configuration management tools. Problems of software engineering and design for graphical user interfaces are discussed.

Prerequisite: CIS 423 and CIS 433 or permission of instructor.

CIS 485 TOPICS IN MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

3 semester hours

A specialized study of various computer science developments. Topics will vary from semester to semester. Students will be allowed to take the course more than once.

ECO 203 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I (ECONOMICS AND THE FREE MARKET SYSTEM)

3 semester hours

Explores the economic implications, history and philosophy of the free enterprise system with special attention to national income theory; money, banking and the Federal Reserve system; Keynesian and Classical theories and the mechanics of the business cycle.

ECO 204 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS II

3 semester hours

Study of microeconomic concepts, price theory, behavior of the firm, market structure, and income distribution.

Prerequisite: ECO 203

MGT 316, PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT

3 semester hours

Explores the principles and processes of managing an organization. The functions of planning, organizing, leading, and motivating employees are applied to current business situations.


Healthcare Management

ACC 213 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES I

3 semester hours

An introduction to financial accounting. Accounting transactions, the accounting cycle, financial statement preparation. Special issues for short- and long-term assets, liabilities, partnerships, and corporations.

ACC 214 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES II

3 semester hours

Continued coverage of financial accounting. Partnerships, corporations, debt and equity financing. Cash flow and financial statement analysis. Introduction to management accounting: job-order and process costing, budgeting and variance analysis.

Prerequisite: ACC 213 or permission of the instructor.

BAD 115, INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS

3 semester hours

An introduction to accounting, marketing, finance, economics, and management. Designed to provide non-majors and new business majors with a preview of the subject matter and job prospects in the business field.

BAD 300, LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS

3 semester hours

The course is designed to cover both the public and private regulation of business. Some of the topics covered are tort law, contract law, agency, partnerships, and corporations.

BAD 304, APPLIED BUSINESS STATISTICS

3 semester hours

The course considers the use of statistics in business for better planning, control and decision making with the focus on using computer statistical software, interpretation and presentation of results. Descriptive and inferential statistics, probability concepts, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance and regression analysis are covered.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 316 or equivalent, Computer Information Systems 300 or equivalent or
permission of the instructor.

BAD 305, QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR BUSINESS

3 semester hours

Explores the use of quantitative methods for decision analysis. Topics include linear programming, sensitivity analysis, integer and goal programming, queuing models and simulation.

Prerequisite: College course work in algebra or MTH 300 with a 2.0 or better, BAD 304, CIS 300

BAD 312, FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

3 semester hours

Designed to provide students with a broad base of understanding of the principles and concepts of corporate financial decision making. The course covers the key financial issues of corporate ethics, time, value of money, valuation of stocks and bonds, risk and return, cost of capital, capital budgeting, leverage and capital structure, and financial statement analysis.

Prerequisite: ACC 213, 214, ECO 203, and ECO 204.

BAD 318, PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING

3 semester hours

A comprehensive analysis of the marketing system and the marketing process.

BAD 360, INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

3 semester hours

An introduction to the unique issues associated with doing business in a global context. Specific challenges of doing business internationally and related managerial strategies are examined.

BAD 480, SENIOR SEMINAR IN BUSINESS: BUSINESS POLICY

3 semester hours

A case study approach designed to apply areas of management, accounting, finance, and economics to contemporary business problems.

Prerequisite: ACC 214, BAD 304, BAD 305, cis 300, ECO 204, BAD 312, BAD 318, senior standing

CIS 300 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

3 semester hours

A general introduction to management information systems theories and concepts, including the organizational role of information systems, prevalent information and communication technologies, and information systems development processes, with an emphasis on tools such as Excel.

ECO 203 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I (ECONOMICS AND THE FREE MARKET SYSTEM)

3 semester hours

Explores the economic implications, history and philosophy of the free enterprise system with special attention to national income theory; money, banking and the Federal Reserve system; Keynesian and Classical theories and the mechanics of the business cycle.

ECO 204 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS II

3 semester hours

Study of microeconomic concepts, price theory, behavior of the firm, market structure, and income distribution.

Prerequisite: ECO 203

HMG 300, INTRODUCTION TO HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT

3 semester hours

This course is an introduction to the healthcare delivery system in the United States with some comparisons to systems in other countries. Health systems at the federal, state, and local level are discussed as well as differences between the private and public sectors. Potential careers in healthcare management are explained. No prerequisites.

HMG 303, ECONOMICS, BUDGETING, AND FINANCE IN HEALTHCARE

3 semester hours

This course applies accounting, finance, and economic principles to the healthcare arena. Participants will understand the impact of economic issues on healthcare, and the impact of healthcare on the economy. Participants will be able to apply accounting and finance principles to healthcare in budgeting, financial statement analysis, and capital management.

Prerequisite: ACC 213, ACC 214; ECO 203, ECO 204; BAD 312; HMG 300.

HMG 310, DIVERSITY AND CULTURE IN HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT

3 semester hours

This course explores the issues of diversity and culture in healthcare – in human resources, patient’s care, and access to care. The growing diversity of communities makes it imperative that healthcare providers understand the diversity and culture of their community, and the cultural meanings and values of illness and disease treatments to various groups. The course explores health and disease symptoms within a cultural setting and the cultural relativity of illness.

Prerequisite: HMG 300

HMG 315, HEALTHCARE QUALITY SEMINAR

3 semester hours

This course explores quality in healthcare. Quality medical care and quality patient care are examined. This course introduces concepts associated with quality management and improvement in the healthcare environments, and introduces the concept of systems thinking and dynamic complexity in healthcare organizations.

Prerequisite: HMG 300

HMG 400, INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL HEALTH

3 semester hours

This course introduces healthcare management issues within the context of comparative biological, social, economic, and political systems. This course examines issues from many sectors (population, environmental health, nutrition, etc.) as well as principles of health system structure, financing, and reform. This course includes both national-level and international issues. The analytical frameworks are applicable to consideration of health issues and systems in developing, emerging, and developed economies. This course aims to build both students master of concepts and theories in international health, as well as practical skills through diverse classroom activities.

Prerequisite: HMG 300

HMG 410, HEALTHCARE LAW AND ETHICS

3 semester hours

This course provides an overview of the interrelationship of the legal system with the structure and function of the health care system in its various forms and settings. Also addresses ethical dilemmas relating to individual patient/client decisions.

Prerequisite: HMG 300

MGT 316, PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT

3 semester hours

Explores the principles and processes of managing an organization. The functions of planning, organizing, leading, and motivating employees are applied to current business situations.

MGT 400, HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

3 semester hours

Principles and practices regarding the recruitment, selection, development, evaluation, compensation, and proper recognition of employees within organizations.

Prerequisite: All business majors must complete MGT 316

MGT 403, HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN ORGANIZATIONS

3 semester hours

The application of human behavior principles common to many types of organizations, specifically business and industry. Motivation, leadership, followership, and human problems are analyzed.

Prerequisite: All business majors must complete MGT 316.

MGT 485, LEADERSHIP

3 semester hours

Includes the definition, traits, and segmentations of leadership. Investigates character as a foundation and similar leadership traits. Mistakes that leaders make, and new demands on future leaders are analyzed through group evaluations and discussions of current and historic leaders.

Prerequisite: All business majors must complete MGT 316


School of Nursing

NUR 301, RESEARCH IN NURSING

3 semester hours

Introduces nursing research as a component of professional nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on the role of the professional nurse in interpreting research findings for applicability to nursing practice and in identifying research problems in nursing practice.

NUR 303, TRENDS IN HEALTH CARE

3 semester hours

The effects of current social, political and economic trends on health care delivery systems, nursing, and the consumer are analyzed.

NUR 307, COMMUNICATION SKILLS IN NURSING

3 semester hours

Introductory nursing course designed to prepare the student to demonstrate effective written and oral/visual communication skills. Competency in basic skills of using a personal computer as a means of communication is included. The course stresses the importance of effective communication as well as the role of computers in health care.

 

NUR 312, ADVANCED HEALTH ASSESSMENT 

2 semester hours


Concentration in the assimilation of previous knowledge of skills of health assessment. Demonstration of skills in performing a health assessment on healthy individuals across the adult life span utilizing the nursing process, adult growth, and development theories, and roles of the Registered Nurse. The student demonstrates advanced skills utilizing a culturally competent, client centered approach.

NUR 402, NURSING CARE OF THE OLDER ADULT
3 semester hours

Related concepts of the normal and pathological changes of aging, commonly encountered diseases of aging, and the broad psychosocial, cultural, and public health knowledge required to provide holistic care for the older adult will be examined. Emphasis will be placed on providing critical information needed to engage in the nursing process of assessing, diagnosing, planning, and evaluation outcomes of care. Credit hours: 3. Pre/co requisite: NUR 307.

NUR 403, LEADERSHIP/MANAGEMENT IN NURSING

4 semester hours

A synthesis of leadership/management theories within health care agencies and organizations. Emphasis is placed on political structures, planning, change theory, group dynamics, research, and their impact on the role of the professional nurse.

NUR 409, SENIOR SEMINAR

3 semester hours

Analysis of contemporary issues related to the practice of professional nursing. Must be taken during the last semester of enrollment in nursing courses.

NUR 412, COMMUNITY AND PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING

4 semester hours

Focus is on Holistic nursing across the life span for individuals, families, and communities addressing health promotion, illness and disease management, health restoration, epidemiology, and community health assessment.

NUR 415, COMMUNITY AND PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING PRACTICUM

2 semester hours

Faculty and preceptor guided clinical experiences in the application of evidence-based nursing practice caring for communities and families in a diverse population with a variety of healthcare needs. (90 hour practicum)


School of Psychology and Counseling

MGT 403, HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN ORGANIZATIONS

3 semester hours

The application of human behavior principles common to many types of organizations, specifically business and industry. Motivation, leadership, followership, and human problems are analyzed.

Prerequisite: All business majors must complete MGT 316.

PSC 315, CIVIL LIBERTIES

3 semester hours

A study of basic freedoms such as speech, press and religion as well as emphasis on the significance of equal protection of the law. Emphasis will be given to both court cases and the development of concepts such as freedom of expression.

SOC 400, MINORITY GROUPS

3 semester hours

A study of present-day racial and cultural minorities with emphasis on scientific facts about race and on changing attitudes and policies.

HEA 402, SEXUALITY/SEX EDUCATION

3 semester hours

An introduction to the study of basic elements and issues of human sexuality. Central to this course is personal knowledge and the ability to communicate effectively with children, family and others in the context of teaching and personal relevancy.

HUS 300, ETHICAL ISSUES IN HELPING PROFESSIONS

3 semester hours

A detailed examination of selected current ethical issues in the human services field. Designed for students who have had substantial course work and/or experience in mental health, psychology, or human services.

HUS 301, TREATMENT MODALITIES

3 semester hours

A survey of theories and procedures appropriate for use with clients of community agencies.

HUS 302, GROUP DYNAMICS

3 semester hours

An introduction to group structure and process and analysis of their effects on individuals.

HUS 310, SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

3 semester hours

A study of the interaction between the individual and the group, and the influence of each on the other.

HUS 320, INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL PRACTICE

3 semester hours

An introduction to the practices, procedures, and techniques involved in a mental health setting.

HUS 374, PSYCHOLOGY OF RELIGION

3 semester hours

A study of the principles of psychology as related to religious experience designed to develop insight into each student’s own spiritual life.

HUS 401, PSYCHOPATHOLOGY

3 semester hours

Survey and analysis of the major mental disorders, interpretation, and theories of therapy, including the relationship of abnormal behavior to social norms.

HUS 402, INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING

3 semester hours

The study of basic theories and functions of counseling. Laboratory emphasis will be upon development of a personal counseling philosophy and its application.

HUS 406, PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY

3 semester hours

A survey of the major theories of personality, with particular emphasis upon experimental studies and research procedures in the study of personality.

HUS 412, PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING

3 semester hours

An introduction to the psychological, social and biological aspects of aging.

HUS 415, JUVENILE DELINQUENCY

3 semester hours

This course is designed to give the student a broad understanding of the topic of juvenile delinquency in the contemporary society. This course integrates discussion of the theory and history of juvenile delinquency with the system’s response to it and includes the administration of justice in the Juvenile Justice System. (See Sociology 315)

HUS 425, CRISIS INTERVENTION COUNSELING

3 semester hours

Analyzes types of crisis theory, effects of crisis on the individual, family and community. Looks at methods and resources for crisis intervention. Emphases are on death and dying, divorce, suicide, chemical dependency, rand and violence in the family. Supervised field experience required.

 

HUS 450, POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY

3 semester hours

This course introduces students to the relatively new and rapidly developing field of positive psychology. Positive psychology focuses on the role of positive emotions, human virtues, and positive institutions in promoting well-being and living a good life.  The course includes the study and discussion of theories and research and the application of research findings.  Students will have the opportunity to apply course material to their own lives in meaningful ways.

HUS 493, SEMINAR IN PSYCHOLOGY

3 semester hours

You may sign up for this class more than once for credit as long as the subject and title of the seminar is different from a seminar you have taken previously.

HUS 497, 498, INTERNSHIP

3 semester hours

The Internship is designed for students enrolled full-time in the Human Services program who do not have professional experience. Criminal background checks and/or drug checks may be required.


Department of Religious Studies and Philosophy

PHI 301, INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC

3 semester hours

An introduction to classical and contemporary logic, emphasizing argumentation and reasoning. Attention to language and its relation to philosophical problems. Examination of the formal laws of valid thought and fallacies found in ordinary discourse.

PHI 337, PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION

3 semester hours

An introduction to selected issues raised through a philosophical investigation of religion including, but not confined to, the nature of religious language, the existence of God, the problem of evil, fideism, revelation, and the challenge of the religions of the world.

Prerequisite: PHI 300 or permission of instructor.

PHI 380, SELECTED TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY

3 semester hours

Prerequisite: PHI 300 or permission of instructor.

REL 302, THE SACRED WRITINGS

3 semester hours

A study of Hebrew poetry and selections of wisdom literature with special reference to its significance in the faith of ancient Israel.

Prerequisite: REL 304

REL 303, OLD TESTAMENT PROPHETS

3 semester hours

A survey of prophecy in Israel with attention given to the historical settings of the individual prophets and to the relevance of their message.

Prerequisite: REL 304

REL 304, OLD TESTAMENT SURVEY

3 semester hours

An introduction and survey of the Old Testament focusing upon the history, literature and faith of the people of Israel. Not offered to the student who has successfully completed Religion 101, Introduction to Old Testament, or its equivalent.

REL 305, NEW TESTAMENT SURVEY

3 semester hours

An introduction and survey of the New Testament focusing upon the history, literature and faith that gave rise to Christianity. Not offered to the student who has successfully completed Religion 102, Introduction to New Testament or its equivalent.

REL 306, OLD TESTAMENT THEOLOGY

3 semester hours

An exploration of Old Testament theological themes.

Prerequisite: REL 304

REL 307, STUDIES IN THE PENTATEUCH

3 semester hours

A critical evaluation of the nature, background, structure, and message of the Pentateuch.

Prerequisite: REL 304

REL 311, SYNOPTIC GOSPELS

3 semester hours

A study of the person, work, and message of Jesus Christ as presented in the Synoptic Gospels.

Prerequisite: REL 305

REL 312, LIFE AND LETTERS OF PAUL

3 semester hours

A study of Paul's life and thought as presented in his Epistles.

Prerequisite: REL 305

REL 314, NEW TESTAMENT THEOLOGY

3 semester hours

A study of certain key concepts of the New Testament which made a definite contribution to the faith of the Early Church.

Prerequisite: REL 305

REL 316, THE WRITINGS OF JOHN

3 semester hours

A study of the background and interpretation of the Fourth Gospel, the Epistles of John, and the Book of Revelation.

Prerequisite: REL 305

REL 317, THE GENERAL EPISTLES AND HEBREWS

3 semester hours

A study of the background, theology, and exegesis of James, I and II Peter, Jude and Hebrews.

Prerequisite: REL 305

REL 321, INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIAN HISTORY

3 semester hours

A study of the history of the Christian church from the first century to the present day.

REL 322, EARLY AND MEDIEVAL CHRISTIANITY

3 semester hours

A survey of the most significant institutional, theological, and social developments in the history of the Christian church from the first century through the latter Middle Ages.

REL 323, MODERN CHRISTIANITY

3 semester hours

Beginning with the Reformation, this course is descriptive of church history to the present.

REL 324, AMERICAN CHRISTIANITY

3 semester hours

A historical survey of the American religious scene from the colonial period to the present. Primary emphasis is given to the development of the more prominent Christian denominations.

REL 325, BAPTIST HERITAGE

3 semester hours

A study of the Baptists' story as well as those convictions and movements which have shaped their life.

REL 326, CHRISTIAN MISSIONS AND EVANGELISM

3 semester hours

A wide-ranging exploration of the Christian mission, including the background and current status of missions, the strategies and methods of cross-cultural missions, and evangelism, and key issues in missions discussion.

REL 328, GLOBAL CHRISTIANITY

3 semester hours

A study of the various expressions of Christianity in the 21st century.

REL 333, CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY

3 semester hours

An introduction to the history, methods, and principal topics of Christian theology.

Prerequisite: REL 304 or 305

REL 341, CHRISTIAN ETHICS

3 semester hours

A systematic study of the nature of morality; a defense of "Christian" ethics; and exploration of principles of Biblical ethics. Specific contemporary ethical issues provide the backdrop for discussions.

REL 342, CHRISTIAN PERSPECTIVES TOWARD VIOLENCE

3 semester hours

This course will explore current and historical attitudes of Christians toward violence, including biblical and theological bases for a specifically Christian response to violence.

REL 343, GROWTH AND REVIVAL IN THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH

3 semester hours

A survey of the major global movements of church growth from the New Testament period to the present day.

REL 346, WORLD RELIGIONS

3 semester hours

An introduction to Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and the religions of China and Japan.

REL 350, INTRODUCTION TO ISLAM

3 semester hours

This course will introduce the students to the historical, theological, and practical developments in Islam. The course will focus on important events, movements, and figures that helped shape contemporary Islam. Students will also be challenged Christian approaches to Islam.

REL 351, BIBLICAL BACKGROUNDS

3 semester hours

A survey of the history and environment of the biblical world presented either as a travel-study course to the Near East or as a regular lecture course on the campus.

Prerequisite: REL 304, 305

REL 352, BIBLICAL INTERPRETATION

3 semester hours

The purpose of this course is to engage students in a study of the theory and practice of biblical interpretation throughout Christian history and in contemporary Christianity. Students will consider traditional approaches to the study of scripture, challenges to those approaches and alternative proposals offered since the Enlightenment, and contemporary ways of interpreting scripture. Students will also study issues relating to the inspiration and authority of scripture and to the contemporary use of scripture in theology, ethics, and broader Christian living. A central aspect of the course will be student’s own engagement with the Bible in actual exegetical practice.

Prerequisite: REL 304, 305

REL 358, PRACTICUM

3 semester hours

An introduction to the many facets of ministry. The course combines reading, discussion, lectures and reflection with guided experience in a church or other ministry setting.

Prerequisite: Approval of the Instructor.

REL 370, HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION

3 semester hours

An inquiry into the biblical, theological, philosophical, and historical foundations for the practice of Christian education.

REL 371, SPIRITUAL FORMATION

3 semester hours

An exploration of personal and spiritual development through self-reflection, self-awareness, and theological reflection. Attention will be given to biblical foundations, spiritual disciplines, and Christian classics.

REL 373, CHURCH LEADERSHIP

3 semester hours

An inquiry into the practice of leadership in Christian churches. The course will examine the philosophy of Christian leadership, models of leadership in communities of faith, the relationship of personal leadership styles and congregational climates, change and conflict management, and common church leadership tasks and traps.

REL 374, PRESCHOOL AND CHILDREN DISCIPLESHIP

3 semester hours

A study of principles and strategies of effective Christian discipleship processes with preschoolers and children, including the study of historical, current, and emerging models. As a part of the course, students will observe preschoolers and children and will practically apply principles for the course in real discipleship settings.

Prerequisite: REL 304 and REL 305

REL 375, YOUTH DISCIPLESHIP

3 semester hours

This course is a basic introduction to youth ministry, including the study of current trends in the field, characteristics of youth, methods for reaching and teaching youth. Included will be opportunities for practical ministry experiences, observing others in youth ministry, and studying resources, programs, and activities for effective youth ministry.

REL 376, ADVANCED YOUTH DISCIPLESHIP

3 semester hours

This course advances and further develops youth discipleship studies offered in RELI 375—Youth Discipleship, integrating both academic and practical forms of discipleship. The course investigates tools necessary to disciple youth and includes opportunities for engaging students in their cultural settings, evaluating different denominational approaches to youth discipleship, publishing in a professional journal, and analyzing and studying resources in discipling youth.

REL 377, ADULT DISCIPLESHIP

3 semester hours

A study of principles and strategies of effective Christian discipleship with adults, including the study of the historical, current, and emerging models. As a part of the course, students will observe and participate in practical application of the course content.

Prerequisite: REL 304, 305

REL 378, CONTEMPORARY RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS

3 semester hours

This course will introduce students to the emergent religious movements that have made their mark on the United States and Europe since 1800. The historical foundations and religious beliefs of selected groups will be addressed. The course will also discuss the impact that such movements have had in the United States and Europe.

REL 397, PASTORAL INTERNSHIP

3 semester hours

A minimum of ten weeks spent in full-time supervised service in the pastoral work of a local church.

Prerequisite: Approval of the Instructor.

REL 490, SENIOR SEMINAR

3 semester hours

Through directed readings, discussions, and research, the course provides and integrative exploration of concepts or issues from various disciplines within the Department. Senior standing required.

Prerequisite: REL 304, REL 305


Department of Social Sciences

CJC 410, PHILOSOPHY OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE

3 semester hours

Major focus: Punishment and alternatives for dealing with law violation and relating underlying ideas, such as responsibility and insanity. Central to this investigation will be a concern for the justification of punishment, legitimacy of alternatives to punishment, justification for considering illegal acts as products of disease, and the reconcilability of a system of punishment with a deterministic view of human behavior.

CJC* Required course in Major

CJC 420, ADMINISTRATIVE DECISION MAKING

3 semester hours

An advanced course in police administration decision making with considerable emphasis on management styles and their effect on the operation of the police force and related criminal justice agencies.

CJC* Required course in Major

CJC 430, CRIMINAL JUSTICE THEORY AND RESEARCH

3 semester hours

A discussion and practical application in operations research as it applies to police department, prosecution management, court scheduling, corrections recidivism, probation and parole. The common theme is the use of quantitative analysis to understand phenomena, to solve problems, and to provide policy guidance.

CJC* Required course in Major

CJC 440, TRENDS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

3 semester hours

An examination of the latest methods and approaches in the criminal justice system. Emphasis is on police, courts, and corrections.

CJC* Required course in Major

CJC 450, INTERNATIONAL ISSUES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

3 semester hours

An overview and insight into nature and complexity of current International Criminal Justice issues. The course will focus on globalization, comparative aspects of the rule of law, the critical need for international communication and cooperation, and evolving transnational crime. Specific topic areas to be addressed include: research on the internet, policing in other countries, terrorism, computer or cyber-crime, money laundering, and trafficking in drugs, people, and arms.

CJC* Required course in Major

CJC 495, 496, INDEPENDENT STUDY

3 semester hours

Open to juniors and seniors who request and are given permission to do a guided reading and/or student-initiated research course that includes a written project/paper.

Prerequisite: Approval by the professor offering the study. Student’s major department, and concurrence of the Dean.

CJC 497, 498, INTERNSHIP

3 semester hours

Designed for students enrolled full-time in the criminal justice program, to enhance academic experience by providing an opportunity to acquire a working knowledge of the practical aspects of the criminal justice system.

HEA 401, DRUG AND ALCOHOL EDUCATION

3 semester hours

An introduction to the sociological, cultural, psychological and physical implications associated with the use and abuse of substances.

HUS 302, GROUP DYNAMICS

3 semester hours

An introduction to group structure and process and analysis of their effects on individuals.

HUS 380, PERSONAL ASSESSMENT AND ADJUSTMENT

3 semester hours

An exploration and analysis of life goals, lifestyle management, identity formation, and adjustment strategies.

HUS 401, PSYCHOPATHOLOGY

3 semester hours

Survey and analysis of the major mental disorders, interpretation, and theories of therapy, including the relationship of abnormal behavior to social norms.

HUS 402, INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING

3 semester hours

The study of basic theories and functions of counseling. Laboratory emphasis will be upon development of a personal counseling philosophy and its application.

HUS 406, PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY

3 semester hours

A survey of the major theories of personality, with particular emphasis upon experimental studies and research procedures in the study of personality.

HUS 412, PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING

3 semester hours

An introduction to the psychological, social and biological aspects of aging.

HUS 425, CRISIS INTERVENTION COUNSELING

3 semester hours

Analyzes types of crisis theory, effects of crisis on the individual, family and community. Looks at methods and resources for crisis intervention. Emphases are on death and dying, divorce, suicide, chemical dependency, rand and violence in the family. Supervised field experience required.

HUS 493, SEMINAR IN PSYCHOLOGY

3 semester hours

You may sign up for this class more than once for credit as long as the subject and title of the seminar is different from a seminar you have taken previously.

MGT 400, HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

3 semester hours

Principles and practices regarding the recruitment, selection, development, evaluation, compensation, and proper recognition of employees within organizations.

Prerequisite: All business majors must complete MGT 316

MGT 403, HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN ORGANIZATIONS

3 semester hours

The application of human behavior principles common to many types of organizations, specifically business and industry. Motivation, leadership, followership, and human problems are analyzed.

Prerequisite: All business majors must complete MGT 316.

MGT 485, LEADERSHIP

3 semester hours

Includes the definition, traits, and segmentations of leadership. Investigates character as a foundation and similar leadership traits. Mistakes that leaders make, and new demands on future leaders are analyzed through group evaluations and discussions of current and historic leaders.

Prerequisite: All business majors must complete MGT 316


DCP Core Course Descriptions

ART 307, ART SURVEY

3 semester hours

A survey course involving encounters with a variety of pieces of visual art, including an overview of our civilization as reflected in art.

 

COM 379, INTERNET SEMINAR

3 semester hours

Advanced work with the Internet in selected areas of research, interpersonal communications, data storage and retrieval and multi media applications.

ENG 101, COMPOSITION I
3 semester hours
Introduction to expository writing by process method. Grammar and mechanics as needed. Selected readings.
ENG 102, COMPOSITION II
3 semester hours
Continuation of process writing with emphasis on argumentation, critiquing, essay examinations, and research skills. Analysis of literary and non-literary texts. 
Prerequisite: English 101
ENG 300, COMPOSITION AND LITERARY INTERPRETATION

3 semester hours


Process writing on topics generated through the study of literature. Students will write in expository, analytical, critical, and research modes.

Prerequisite: ENG 101 or its equivalent.

ENG 311, BRITISH LITERATURE SURVEY I

3 semester hours

Representative writers of British Literature from the beginning of British Literature to the eighteenth century.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or ENG 300.

ENG 312, BRITISH LITERATURE SURVEY II

3 semester hours

Representative writers of British Literature from the eighteenth century to the present.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or ENG 300.

ENG 331, AMERICAN LITERATURE SURVEY I

3 semester hours

Representative writers from the American Colonial period to Whitman, mid-nineteenth century.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or ENG 300.

ENG 332, AMERICAN LITERATURE SURVEY II

3 semester hours

Representative writers of the United States from Walt Whitman to the present.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or ENG 300.

ENG 351, WORLD LITERATURE I

3 semester hours

Literature from ancient times through 16th century in western and non-western cultures, excluding British and American.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or ENG 300.

ENG 352, WORLD LITERATURE II

3 semester hours

Literature from the 16th century through present in western and non-western cultures, excluding British and American.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or ENG 300.

FRE 300, ASPECTS OF FRENCH CULTURE AND LANGUAGE

3 semester hours

An introduction to selected aspects of French Culture, including the rudiments of the French language. No prior knowledge of French is required.

GER 300, ASPECTS OF GERMAN CULTURE AND LANGUAGE

3 semester hours

An introduction to selected aspects of German Culture, including the rudiments of the German language. No prior knowledge of German is required.

HIS 301, ISSUES IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION, PRE-HISTORY TO 1715

3 semester hours

Beginning with the earliest times, the course covers the civilization of Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece, Rome, Medieval and Early modern periods. Concludes with 1715.

HIS 302, ISSUES IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION, SINCE 1715

3 semester hours

Beginning with 1715, this course presents a perspective of the last three centuries of western history.

HIS 319, THE UNITED STATES IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

3 semester hours

A study formulated to emphasize events, movements, and trends in modern America and to examine the functioning of constitutional principles.

HPE 338, HEALTH MAINTENANCE, PROMOTION AND WELLNESS

3 semester hours

An examination of the concepts, attitudes, and skills that contribute to personal health and physical fitness. Physical activity involved.

LIB 301, RESEARCH SKILLS

1 semester hour

This course is designed to develop the student’s information literacy skills: the ability to recognize when information is needed and to locate, evaluate, and effectively use that information. 1-0-1 (Fall, Spring, and Summer online)

 

MTH 309 FINITE MATHEMATICS

3 semester hours

A study of topics related to elementary matrix algebra, systems of equations and inequalities, linear programming, and the mathematics of finance. The purpose of this course is to prepare the student to converse in the language of linear mathematics and matrices, and the mathematics of finance fundamental to the studies in business and the social sciences. Additionally, the course is designed to give the quantitative, computational and problem solving skills necessary for those areas, but applicable to in a wide range of life experiences. 3-0-3. (Fall and Spring)

MTH 316, FUNDAMENTALS OF STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY

3 semester hours

Basic statistical analysis. Introductory principles of probability with applications. A working knowledge of advanced high school algebra or intermediate community college algebra is expected.

MTH 320, MATH FOR THE LIBERAL ARTS

3 semester hours

The purpose of this course is to give an introduction to and an appreciation for the ways quantitative and geometric reasoning inform problems encountered across a wide range of human activities – from politics and economics to social networking and games. Additionally, the course is designed to introduce the quantitative, computational and problem solving skills necessary for applying that reasoning. 3-0-3. (Fall and Spring face-to-face at selected centers and online)

MUS 320, SURVEY OF MUSIC

3 semester hours

A survey of music for the non-music major which includes a study of music elements, the development of music from the middle ages to the present day, and the listening and analysis of music literature appropriate to the period studied. Some concert listening/attendance may be required.

PSC 302, AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

3 semester hours

A comprehensive presentation of the principles of American constitutional government, and a behavioral analysis of the institutions and processes of the national and state governments and the Federal system.

REL 304, OLD TESTAMENT SURVEY

3 semester hours

An introduction and survey of the Old Testament focusing upon the history, literature and faith of the people of Israel. Not offered to the student who has successfully completed Religion 101, Introduction to Old Testament, or its equivalent.

REL 305, NEW TESTAMENT SURVEY

3 semester hours

An introduction and survey of the New Testament focusing upon the history, literature and faith that gave rise to Christianity. Not offered to the student who has successfully completed Religion 102, Introduction to New Testament or its equivalent.

SCI 302, PHYSICAL SCIENCE

3 semester hours

Introduction of structure and behavior of matter. Survey of geology, meteorology, and astronomy, with emphasis on underlying physical and/or chemical principles, and practical applications of these principles.

SCI 303, HUMAN BIOLOGY

3 semester hours

An introduction to the biology of the human organism with emphasis on contemporary issues in human biology as well as traditional structure and function of major body systems.

SCI 322, ENVIRONMENT

3 semester hours

Survey of principles of ecology with emphasis on human impact on the environment. Literature of ecological movement in the U.S. since 1960. Weekend field trips may be required.

SPN 300, ASPECTS OF HISPANIC CULTURE AND LANGUAGE

3 semester hours

An introduction to selected aspects of Hispanic culture, including the rudiments of the Spanish language. No prior knowledge of Spanish is required.

SSC 305, GLOBAL UNDERSTANDING

3 semester hours

An introduction to the major economic, social, political, diplomatic, and environmental trends in the world since 1945. Geography is emphasized in the course.

THEA 235 THEATRE SURVEY

3 semester hours

Encourages an appreciation and basic understanding of the world of live theatrical performance. The course focuses on the artistry and mechanics of producing the modern stage play. The knowledge, skills and talents necessary to succeed in the theater arts are studied. Attendance at live theater performances may be required.